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Original Article



Importance of Alpha-adrenergic Receptor Subtypes in Regulating of Airways Tonus at Patients with Bronchial Asthma

Pellumb Islami, Ali Ilazi, Arianit Jakupi, Sadi Bexheti, Hilmi Islami.




Abstract

Background: In this work, effect of Tamsulosin hydrochloride as antagonist of alpha1A and alpha1B- adrenergic receptor and effect of Salbutamol as agonist of beta2- adrenergic receptor in patients with bronchial asthma and increased bronchial reactibility was studied. Methods: Parameters of the lung function are determined by Body plethysmography. Raw and ITGV were registered and specific resistance (SRaw) was also calculated. Tamsulosin was administered in per os way as a preparation in the form of the capsules with a brand name of “Prolosin”, producer: Niche Generics Limited, Hitchin, Herts. Results: Results gained from this research show that blockage of alpha1A and alpha1B- adrenergic receptor with Tamsulosin hydrochloride (0.4 mg and 0.8 mg in per os way) has not changed significantly (p > 0.1) the bronchomotor tonus of tracheobronchial tree in comparison to the inhalation of Salbutamol as agonist of beta2- adrenergic receptor (2 inh. x 0.2 mg), (p < 0.05). Arterial blood pressure showed no significant decrease following the administration of the dose of 0.8 mg Tamsulosin. Conclusion: This suggests that the activity of alpha1A and alpha1B- adrenergic receptor in the smooth musculature is not a primary mechanism which causes reaction in patients with increased bronchial reactibility, in comparison to agonists of beta2 – adrenergic receptor which emphasizes their significant action in the reduction of specific resistance of airways.

Key words: Tamsulosin hydrochloride, Salbutamol.






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