Home|Journals|Articles by Year Follow on Twitter

Directory for Medical Articles
 

Open Access

Original Research



Differences in pain in postoperative cholecystectomy laparotomy patients with the Kocher incision and midline incision techniques

Juan Fariz Oktorian, Warsinggih, Muhammad Asykar Palinrungi.

Abstract
Purpose: Compare the pain of the kocher incision and midline incision in postoperative patients with cholecystectomy laparotomy.
Methods: Observational randomized controlled double sampling trial study
Results: Pain that was felt by patients after 24 hours postoperatively with the kocher incision technique, most showed a score of 3, which was 12 patients (60%), whereas pain felt by patients with a midline incision technique mostly showed a score of 2 ie there were 10 patients (50 %). Overall, the midline incision showed lower VAS results when compared to the kocher incision, where most of the VAS in the midline incision showed a score of 2, whereas the kocher incision showed a score of 3. The results of the mann whitney statistical test showed a value of p = 0.192 (p> 0 , 05), which means that there is no significant difference between the pain level of the kocher group and the midline group.
Conclusions: There was no significant difference between the level of pain in the group of patients who received the treatment with the kocher technique and the group with the midline technique.

Key words: Surgical Pain, Laparotomy Cholecystectomy, Kocher Incision, Midline Incision


Full-text options

Full-text Article




Advertisement
American Journal of Diagnostic Imaging

SUBMIT YOUR ARTICLE NOW




ScopeMed.com
BiblioMed Home
Follow ScopeMed on Twitter
Author Tools
eJPort Journal Hosting
About BiblioMed
License Information
Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Contact Us

The articles in Bibliomed are open access articles licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.
ScopeMed is a Database Service for Scientific Publications. Copyright ScopeMed Information Services.